Building trust among your stakeholders is essential to your success.  Earning it takes a long time.  Maintaining it requires constant attention.  Losing it happens in seconds!

How do you build and maintain trust?

Care more about the needs and interests of your stakeholders than you do about your own.

Organization development specialists have many activities to help you begin to build trust.  Teambuilding activities are often designed to help people get to know each other and understand their respective frames of reference in an effort to build trust.  Activities like leading a blindfolded person through a maze are approaches to getting people to allow someone else to be in control of their life and to trust them with that control.  Survival games take people out of their normal business environment so they can get to know each other in a different light and under different circumstances.

The point of most of these activities is to manage fear.  A lack of trust stems from fear.  That fear is based in unknowns and how those unknowns might cause harm.  Having information reduces those unknowns…reduces the fear…builds trust.  That’s the idea.  They allow people to get to know you…to get to know the different facets of you.  Simple.

Interestingly, many leaders feel that it is not in their best interest to allow people to get to know them.  They fear that if people know them they will lose power or influence over them.  While I do think that there is some degree of importance to maintaining a “distance”, there are distinct advantages to allowing people to know you.

At the end of the day, there are many things you can do to build trust.  However, none of them will be as clear or send as powerful a message as how you live your life every day.  The people you lead are watching every step you take…and judging each and every one.  Their current perception of you is based on the latest step they have observed  you taking.

For me, one fundamental premise should be your guide on how to take those steps and earn the trust of your stakeholders…

CARE MORE ABOUT THEIR NEEDS AND INTERESTS THAN YOU CARE ABOUT YOUR OWN.

Understand that not every decision you make will benefit every group of stakeholders.  There are often conflicting interests among stakeholders such as increased pay for Employees and increased profits for Owners.  You must make those trade-offs and balance meeting those needs over the long term.  (More on that in the next post!)

Evaluate every decision you make from the perspective of how it will affect them.  If you can do that and then look them in the eye and explain your rationale, then even the toughest decisions, and those that do not necessarily work to everyone’s benefit, will earn you their trust.

One interesting side effect…the more trust you earn, the less explaining you will have to do.